Teen dating violence organizations


03-Jun-2017 15:05

A month later, he assaulted her at school and Kaity and her family got an injunction against harassment to help protect her. A few weeks later, while Kaity was walking home from school, her ex-boyfriend shot and killed her before turning the gun on himself and committing suicide. “She was a victim of teen dating violence in the worst imaginable way,” says her mother, Bobbi Sudberry.After Kaity’s death, Bobbi and her husband, Ric, realized how little awareness there was surrounding teen dating violence.The 2013 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey found approximately 10% of high school students reported physical victimization and 10% reported sexual victimization from a dating partner in the 12 months* before they were surveyed. Teens receive messages about how to behave in relationships from peers, adults in their lives, and the media. Risks of having unhealthy relationships increase for teens who: Dating violence can be prevented when teens, families, organizations, and communities work together to implement effective prevention strategies.All too often these examples suggest that violence in a relationship is normal, but violence is never acceptable. However, these behaviors can become abusive and develop into more serious forms of violence.

One young girl shared a very personal account of her experience with teenage dating violence in “48 Hours” Live to Tell: Sophia’s Secret Learn more about Sophia’s story – and where help is available: National Domestic Violence Hotline: 1-800-799-SAFE (7233) | 1-800-787-3224 [TTY] Love is Respect: 1-866-331-9474 | 1.866.331.8453 [TTY]RAINN: National Sexual Assault Hotline: 1-800-656-HOPE (4673)Love is Respect provides resources for teens, parents, friends and family, peer advocates, government officials, law enforcement officials and the general public. YWCA: offers support for women and girls through sexual assault and domestic violence programs, and more Breakthe engages, educates, and empowers youth to build lives and communities free from domestic and dating violence.

“Without hesitation I said ‘yes.’ That’s when I started looking into statistics,” she says.

Parents Are in the Dark According to Love Is Respect.org, 81 percent of parents either don’t think teen dating violence is an issue or don’t know if it’s an issue. In the United States, 1.5 million high school students experience dating violence every year, and only 33 percent of them report the abuse.

“Initially we were handing out information, but we got a lot of requests to present.

We’ve seen our presentations grow exponentially,” Bobbi says. In 2016 we did 180.” Kaity’s Way offers two different types of sessions: School presentations, where they share Kaity’s story and educate teens on the early warning signs of dating violence and on how to get help.The site offers fact sheets, information, and resources about teen dating abuse to help teens, their parents and friends understand more about this growing problem.